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German word of the day - Wortschatz
http://www.rosenrot.ca/forums/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=4527
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Author:  nina hagen [ Tue Feb 25, 2014 2:21 am ]
Post subject:  German word of the day - Wortschatz

I'd like to start a new thread to improve everybody's German vocabulary. Feel free to add every word you wish :sun: :thankyou: :sun:
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Author:  nina hagen [ Tue Feb 25, 2014 7:27 am ]
Post subject:  Re: German word of the day - Wortschatz

Körpersprache ''body language''

My German teacher today explained to the class what "Körpersprache" means... by showing us her middle finger :shock: :doh: :D :lol:
We will all remember that :angel:

Author:  nina hagen [ Wed Feb 26, 2014 3:05 am ]
Post subject:  Re: German word of the day - Wortschatz

The word of the day is Gesicht "face". I'm ending up learning it since I find it over and over again in Rammstein's song :D but I'm actually getting crazy in order to distinguish Gesicht from Gedicht from Geschichte and a number of other similar words :dunce: In this cases also for other languages I find it useful to use etymology.

Gesicht:
*Prefix ge- which is common to many words and should be linked to a meaning like "done, performed" :champagne:
*The noun sicht is apparently connected with English sight (vision) :shock:

Author:  nina hagen [ Thu Feb 27, 2014 3:19 am ]
Post subject:  Re: German word of the day - Wortschatz

The word of the day is Arzt. I've chosen it because I'm always confused about the spelling (where the f*** that ''t'' goes??? :evil: )

Well it's A.R.Z.T., not artz nor artzt.

As I find etymology usually very helping in memorising words, I've found it's originally a loan word from Ancient Greek archi- (super, chief) and -iatros (doctor).

''Arzt'' is the common doctor, instead to call a specialised doctor, German uses compounds. In other languages loan words from Ancient Greek are used, so to me compounds sound very funny here, because if you translate them literally, they look like children's language :D

children's doctor: Kinderarzt (pediatrician)
animal doctor: Tierarzt (veterinary)
women's doctor: Frauenarzt ( gynaecologist)
ear, nose and throat doctor: Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Arzt (otorhinolaryngologist) :-) :-) :-)

Author:  nina hagen [ Fri Feb 28, 2014 6:29 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: German word of the day - Wortschatz

The word of the day is Schmerz ''pain''.

I've chosen it because of its R+ connected meaning and because it may be useful sometimes when you travel and may be going to the chemist's :killmenow:

Its etymon is linked to the English word smart, the image is that of something ''pointed'' that causes pain. As usual, it can form compounds with other words, especially in the plural form, so :

Kopfschmerzen: headache
Halsschmerzen: sore throat
Rückenschmerzen: backpain
etc.

A very close expression is the verb "wehtun" (to hurt). The etymon of "weh" is linked to the English word "woe", tun corresponds to the English ''do''. If you want to say something hurts you, you can say:

Ich habe Schmerzen (I've got pain) or Es tut mir weh (It hurts me)

Mein arm tut mir weh : My arm hurt.

Mir oh weh! : Alas!

Author:  nina hagen [ Sun Mar 02, 2014 7:44 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: German word of the day - Wortschatz

Ehm I'm not sure I get it :oops: are you requesting synonyms of "ficken" 8) or asking for an explation of the word körpersprache? Our teacher wanted to show us how many interesting things you can express by body language :twisted: :D

Anyway, here a (short?) list of synonyms :lol: :twisted: , the one that makes me laugh is vögeln, because I know the word vogel (''bird'').

bumsen - pimpern - vögeln - poppen - pempern [österr.]

Actually you gave me an idea :wink: Vogel can ben the word of the day :lol:

der Vogel (the bird) die Vögel (the birds)

Everybody will recall the line of Ohne Dich: "Und die Vögel singen nicht mehr" (and the birds don't sing anymore)

And also the lines of the illustrious poem Rote Haare : "ich schenk dir eine Dose Vögel/sind in Flammen wie das Dach deiner Beine ( "I bestow to you a can of birds/they are on fire like the roof of your legs")

Author:  nina hagen [ Fri Mar 07, 2014 10:20 am ]
Post subject:  Re: German word of the day - Wortschatz

^ Kary, yes precisely ! :)

The words I've chosen for today are the verbs laufen and lachen. I always mix them up because of their resemblance to the English 'laugh' which is close to lachen but is pronounced like laufen.

So I'll try to write down something to memorise them.

lachen | lachte, gelacht ''laugh'' is actually connected to the English word laugh

instead

laufen | lief, gelaufen "run" is linked to the English words ''labour'' and "galop''. See 'f' as a sort of consumed 'b'/ 'p'.

Author:  nina hagen [ Fri Mar 21, 2014 5:31 am ]
Post subject:  Re: German word of the day - Wortschatz

The word of the day is der Schmutz ''dirt''. I should explain perhaps that I'm choosing words I find it difficult to memorise, for some reason and Schmutz is one of them - I actually keep on confusing it with der Schmerz and other similar words.

Its etymon is connected to English "smut", so one can probably make a memory-map and linking Schmerz to smart and Schmutz with smut.

Author:  colette [ Mon May 12, 2014 11:47 am ]
Post subject:  Re: German word of the day - Wortschatz

a bit different but I had to laugh :lol: :lol: :champagne:
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Author:  nina hagen [ Sat May 17, 2014 10:05 am ]
Post subject:  Re: German word of the day - Wortschatz

:rolling: :rolling: :rolling: Danke !!!

I link this wonderful 100 days project "Found in Translation" by Anjana, in which she portrays words in many languages that cannot be translated in English

Several words in German:

Backpfeifengesicht

Waldeinsamkeit

Ohrwurm

and many others! Enjoy !

Author:  colette [ Wed May 28, 2014 7:30 am ]
Post subject:  Re: German word of the day - Wortschatz

^ Learned something again.......Ohrwurm... In Dutch Oorwurm so almost the same , but never knew this explanation. An insect is actually called that and we use it in a saying; He made a face like an oorwurm!
http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oorwormen
The saying :lol:
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Author:  Kettenhund [ Sat Jun 07, 2014 6:59 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: German word of the day - Wortschatz

The drunk German... "Alaska". :rolling:

I hope it's okay that I borrow your thread for this. :) Since I read about Berlin and the renovations and construction work in the city, I came across the word "Richtfest" in a few places. That a Richtfest was planned for this year or they have just celebrated a Richtfest. I didn't know this word actually, so I looked it up and read about it.
It's apparently a celebration held when they have put the last beam on the rooftop of a building that is still under construction. Then they have a kind of party at the building site and place a wreath on the roof beams. :D I thought it was an interesting tradition.
Here is about the Richtfest for the reconstructed cupola on the city library in Berlin: http://www.morgenpost.de/berlin-aktuell ... othek.html

Author:  ServasMUW [ Wed Aug 06, 2014 11:21 am ]
Post subject:  Re: German word of the day - Wortschatz

For me, a typical german word that you can't translate into english is Schadenfreude

It is a noun that desribes the pleasure you feel when someone else expiriences some damage (like when s/he falls down, or gets into trouble, etc.)
It probably exists in the german language and not in the english because german speaking people are not as "kind" and therefor it is necessary for them to have a word lie this included in their vocabluary (or they are just more open about those kind of feelings :p ).

Author:  Kettenhund [ Thu Aug 07, 2014 4:31 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: German word of the day - Wortschatz

^ They have this exact word in Swedish too. "Skadeglädje". It is an exact translation and means exactly the same. That you feel joy from someone else's misfortune. It's not even that you gain anything from it yourself, you are just happy that something bad happens to someone else. There is even a Swedsih saying that "Schadenfreude/skadeglädje is the only true joy." :? I always thought that was kind of an awful saying. But people here are almost proud to admit that: "Oh, something went really bad for my colleague/neighbour, now I feel true skadeglädje."

One German word I always liked and think is funny is Nervensäge. It means "pain in the neck" as in someone who is annoying, but the literal translation is "nerve saw." :lol:

Author:  nina hagen [ Thu Oct 09, 2014 4:42 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: German word of the day - Wortschatz

^ this is very interesting, to have a specific word to call something so disagreable. I'm not sure people who don't use the word don't feel the same too, sometimes.

Nervensäge would be something that saws your neck? :lol:


my contribution of the day

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