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 Post subject: Re: Online German Resources
PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2011 9:18 pm 
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Was given this link by a German friend. It's supposed to help you pronounce the words. Haven't tried it YET, but it's worth a look!

http://www.dict.cc/?s=na+klar

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 Post subject: Re: Online German Resources
PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2012 5:15 pm 
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I have a website and some books that I think would be pretty useful.

First off the website:
http://joycep.myweb.port.ac.uk/abinitio/
A fairly good website that'll help with the basics of German.

Books:
I'm going to include the author's name, the title and the ISBN of the books, along with a little something about them.

Essential German Grammar
Martin Durrell
9780340741894
-This book is a great resource and it does a good job of explaining and providing examples of what's explained in the chapter. It's not bulky or anything like that yet it goes pretty in depth with the grammar and shows you examples in context usually a text at the end of the chapter. You might find yourself highlighting and underlining key points and making notes. The boxes that have the examples sentences are good because they actually differentiate the different parts of the sentence and have diagrams to help you with word order.

Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
HarperCollins Publisher
9780061374883
- I got this dictionary from Borders before it went bankrupt for about 10 bucks. It's German-English and English-German with a full color insert between the two sections. This insert has things like color, holidays, telling time, family members, food, heading letters, German txting, etc. Next to the definitions they give you the plural form of the word if there is one also they give you short example usage sentences and special phrases.

The Big Yellow Book of German Verbs
Paul Listen
978007148759
- Contains 555 fully conjugated verbs in every tense with idioms and expressions underneath. It also has a top 50 verbs list (most used verbs). The first 38 pages give you descriptions of the tenses and explains in some detail how they're formed. It came with a CD-ROM which you can use to test your knowledge. At the end just before the index, they have a few exercises to test your knowledge of the tenses, they just ask you to conjugate the given verb in a certain tense. It's the holy grail of German verbs and good for reference. Although the verb tense descriptions are a bit technical and if you're not familar with certain grammar terms you'll easily get lost.

German DeMystified
Ed Swick
9780071475617
- Follows the same trajectory as most of the other DeMystified books as far as format goes. It's a good starter and covers a fair amount of material. You're constantly reinforcing skills that you've learned and each chapter builds on the previous one and luckily you can check your answers in the back. The glossary is abysmal and some of the questions in the workbook presented early on can be confusing since it doesn't explain some things. I had to ask on Yahoo Answers about their usage of the word 'morgen' since as a beginner I wouldn't have known.

Basic German
Jolene Wochenske
978007163470
- From the Practice Makes Perfect series. If you're a beginner, START WITH THIS BOOK and not the other ones. They seem to build up from Beginner to Advanced and this book is essential to understanding the rest. Has a nice vocab bank in the beginning of each chapter along with charts for you to refer too with endings. Each lesson is short, so you don't have to take too much in. Simple explanations in plain English. Most of the exercises are back and forth translations from German to English and English to German. You'll be doing a fair amount of highlighting in this one as well.

Complete German Grammar
Ed Swick
9780071763608
-Follow up Basic German with this book. It's a Beginner-Intermediate but still takes you back to the very basics of German and brings you up to making your own sentences a bit more advanced than found in the previous book and sentence structure seems to be at the forefront with this book as you are immediately asking questions and negating sentences. You won't find many vocabulary banks in this one, only some that help with adjectives, verbs, or adverbs.

German Sentence Builder
Ed Swick
9780071599627
- Intermediate level book that focuses on word order. Like the other books translation back and forth is what you'll be doing. If you've been at German for a while this book will come easy to you and could serve as a good refersher or reference for word order. It starts off with simple sentences and then gradually adds on more elements. It'll tell you the word order for sentences of a certain type or when you use words a certain way, for example:
Predicative adverb: subject + linking verb + adjective = Die Frau ist krank.
Attributive adverb: subject + verb + declined adjective + object = Die Frau hilft dem kranken Kind.

German Verb Tenses
Astrid Henschel
9780071451376
- Covers all the verb tenses and shows you when and why to use a particular tense to correctly speak German. Filled to the brim with practice exercises, even ones that have odd themes to them...

Whew! Last book!

Talk Dirty German
Alexis Munier
9781605506531
-It's almost like a travel guide and slang German dictionary in one. The author gives you a nice little cultural tidbit about the chapter title and then she shows you the slang, defines it (and provides a literal translation), uses it in a sentence. Despite the title it isn't all curse words, although there are some. It's like the phrases we say, only how Germans say them.
Example: My uncle is a big shot in the banking industry.
Mein Onkel is ein ganz grosses Tier in der Bankbranche.
I haven't been able to confirm whether or not this colloquial phrases are actually said by the Germans, but its a neat little book and it'll make you LOL.

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 Post subject: Re: Online German Resources
PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2012 1:15 am 
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^ Thank you!

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 Post subject: Re: Online German Resources
PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2012 6:08 am 
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It's a Dutch site to learn a little German, so i don't know if anyone here will be able to use it?

http://educatie.ntr.nl/duits/1535645/cursus/

This section is fun, some games to learn german words...

http://educatie.ntr.nl/duits/1535817/speel/

There is an app for Android, Iphone and Ipad to learn German, my kids love to play that. It's called Learn Like Kids
https://market.android.com/details?id=c ... GVmcmVlIl0.

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 Post subject: Re: Online German Resources
PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2012 8:07 am 
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@Beekay: No problem. 8)

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 Post subject: Re: Online German Resources
PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2012 12:58 am 
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Thank you Tessie!

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 Post subject: Re: Online German Resources
PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2012 12:39 am 
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Just like to back up the recommendation for Deutsche-Welle. The online course is used as a supplement for my German 001 class here at Dartmouth, which means it's very high quality. :D Also, I'd recommend reading their articles and watching their videos/programs, as well as listening to their radio. Also, search "Rammstein" on the site. They've posted quite a lot of things about them!

In my German class here at Dartmouth we are using this book:
http://www.amazon.com/Deutsch-Introduct ... 699&sr=1-1
Deutsch: Na Klar! (6e) (German: You Bet! 6th edition)
ISBN-10: 0073386332
ISBN-13: 978-0073386331
Publication Date: January 7, 2011

Amazon rates this textbook as 3 stars, a rating that I highly disagree with. I rate this textbook at 5 stars--the low rating appears to be from the fact that many people don't consider this textbook necessary for a class and think that it's good and clear enough to study alone, something which for me actually raises the rating (trust me, I'm bilingual and have learned French and Japansese--a textbook this imformative, clear, and easy to study is hard to come by!). The cost is ridiculous, I agree, but I think it's worth it.

It also comes with free audio files that you can listen to or download to your computer. These supplement lessons and teach you to listen to proper German in a variety of accents while challenging you to repeat and complete the book activities/exercises:
http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0 ... audio.html

This is great because it means that you don't need to pay extra for audio CDs for this textbook. You just buy the book and you're set. There's apparently a lab manual too, but that is not really necessary.

The last thing I have to say is not a link to a German study aide, but rather advice on learning. Here at Dartmouth, students are required to take 3 foreign language courses and are proficient to semi-fluent by the end of only these 3 courses (and it only takes around 8-9 months). That's because we're taught foreign languages with the Rassias Method, named after its inventor, a Dartmouth Professor who aimed to teach students language in a way that replicates as closely as possible the way we learn language as children: through constant hearing of the language, repetition and mimicry, completing reading and writing exercises, and through simulating an environment as close as possible to living in a country where the language is spoken all the time. For more information on the method, check out the website here: http://rassias.dartmouth.edu/

Basically, this method involves several components:
1) A short language class (50 minutes long). Studies have shown that people can't concentrate for stretches more than 55 minutes long, and that language, especially, is best learned in short, intensive spurts. If you want to learn German but aren't in a class, you can replicate this step by buying a textbook and teaching yourself by going through it for 50 minutes, 4 days a week. For most textbooks, make it your goal to go through a chapter a week. Assign yourself all of the exercises and act as your own "instructor". You will need discipline for this.

2) A "drill" in the foreign language. Drill gives us intensive exposure to hearing and speaking a foreign language in a natural setting--it mimics the experience of living in a foreign country by exposing our brains to hearing and speaking in a foreign language. Drill is 45 minutes long, is done either in the morning or afternoon, 4 days a week (on the same day as classes), and is led by an advanced student or a native speaker. No more than 10 students are in a drill session at any given time. The driller is not allowed to speak in English, only in the native language. The driller has no accent in the language (perfect speech) and will say a phrase several times, first getting all students to repeat it (choral), then getting individual students to repeat it. For long phrases, the driller, will then break up the phrase into the last part, get all then each person to repeat it, then keep extending it from the end of the phrase to its start until all students can repeat it. Another drill exercise is to get students to understand a grammatical concept by leading them through example. An example of this is the driller saying "Der Mann gebort in Januar 3. *snaps fingers, points to mouth* Er gebort in Januar 3." The drillees will hopefully understand that the purpose of the exercise is to replace names/titles with personal pronouns. Another example is "Er gebort in Januar 3. *snaps fingers, points to mouth* Sie geboren in Januar 3." The drillees will then realize that the purpose is to test their conjugation of verbs with different pronouns. The driller will go around the room, giving each person a different pronoun to conjugate with, each time snapping their fingers and pointing at the individual person, thus forcing students to pay attention and think quickly.

Drill is very important because it forces you to really listen to a real person speaking the language (which is a huge part of learning how to communicate), gradually improves your pronunciation, tricks your brain into thinking that you are in a country where you hear and speak this language frequently (therefore making your brain learn it better and faster), forces you to think on your feet in the foreign language, improves recognition of terms, phrases, and even tone in the language, and most importantly, forces you to speak. Speaking is one of the most important things you can do to learn a language: Just read everything German in your book out loud. Read all the exercises, and dialogues out loud. When listening to an audio track, say it along with the audio. On Deutsche-Welle, say everything, not just during the parts where they ask you to. It has been proven that things are consolidated from our short-term memories to our long-term memories when we say them out loud several times. If you say words in a language out loud, you will be over 200% more likely to remember it later. That's a HUGE difference.

Now, most of you are thinking, "But I don't have anything like drill here! How does this help me?!?" If you are lucky enough to know a German speaker in your area, especially a native one, you can ask them to do something similar with you by asking them to create these kinds of exercises where they force you to think while repeating, speaking, and improving your memory and pronunciation. Having them read exercises off of flashcards really helps. Make sure that they stand while you sit because it makes you psychologically more attentive. A big part of drill is forcing your mind to pay attention to the speaker by playing these tricks on it, such as putting your driller into a position of power over you. Have them take advantage of this by not letting you get away with mispronunciations--they must keep saying the words until you are able to get close to what they are saying. If you don't remember the sentence or phrase, have them help you out by saying certain words. Have them look into your eyes as they drill you--you should also be looking at their face, particularly their mouth to see how they move their lips. (Don't worry, simply looking at someone's face while they speak is enough to get you to subconsciously mimic them very well). Have them snap their fingers to get your attention. AND ABSOLUTELY NO ENGLISH ALLOWED DURING DRILL. EVER. (Sorry, not meaning to scare people, but this is a biggie since you're trying to trick your brain that you live somewhere where you need to learn German to get by).

If you don't know anyone who knows a lot of German and is willing to do this, you can approximate drill yourself by saying absolutely everything German that you read out loud several times, like I outlined. Also, other exercises that will help you include closing your eyes and saying the word as you spell it out visually in your mind, or imaging an image of the meaning of the word. You should also change up the dialogue or exercises to make them a bit more difficult once you have already done them, and then say them out loud as you do them. Make sure that you find as many examples of proper spoken German to imitate (sadly, R+ does not count as "spoken", nor as "proper"--Till sings in a Saxony accent :P ). Listen to a radio program or video or dialogue several times, then say it along with them. Maybe even pause after each line, repeat what you heard, then go back. Drill is all about challenging yourself, while speaking and listening. You have to speak A LOT, or you won't learn the language, and natives won't be able to communicate with you or understand you.

3) Wiederholung (Repetition). You must go back over the material you've learned by doing exercises. Read (and say) the dialogues from the previous chapter again. Do the same exercises again. Go back to that list of words at the start of the chapter once you've reached the end, and make flashcards for them, or find another way to practice them. Practice any grammar that you've learned. Studies have proven that real learning in humans takes place when we repeat something by going back over it. We may learn something new (forward learning), but we won't truly understand or remember it unless we practice it and revisit it (backwards learning). It takes both to learn anything, including languages. For this, as well as for forwards learning, you should set aside an hour of your day. However, you should split that hour up into 3 20-minute intervals scattered throughout your day. Language is best learned several times a day in short, intensive intervals (intensive=no distractions whatsoever). Long study periods might be useful occasionally, but our brains like to learn language in short bursts so they don't get tired out. Learning several times a day also helps to trick our brains into thinking that we use the language several times every day because we live in a place where everyone else speaks only/mostly that language, which speeds up learning. Definitely learn something or do exercises at least once a day for a half an hour to 50 minutes if you can't learn several times a day. Just a tiny bit each day makes you learn much, much faster than a lot once or twice a week. Trust me, the difference is huge. (Oh, and repetition should not be the same as your class time. Repetition is backwards learning. Class time is forwards learning. The two should be kept separate and both should be done. You should do repetition more frequently than you have class).

Sorry for the long post, but this advice is really useful (in my opinion) since you have to be conscious of how your brain works and how learning works in order to effectively learn. If you keep this advice in mind and structure your learning so that you learn every day with these methods, you will see huge gains in your language knowledge over time, as opposed to if you were learning just once or twice a week for much longer! I hope that this helps anyone looking to learn German, or any foreign language! :D

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 Post subject: Re: Online German Resources
PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2012 1:06 am 
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^ Many, many thanks! (I thought "Na Klar" sounded familiar - then I realised I'd purchased an earlier edition at my university a few years ago). :)

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 Post subject: Re: Online German Resources
PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2012 10:56 am 
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This thread is really useful. :-) I'm trying to learn a bit of German at the moment and stumbled across this forum, if anyone is interested:

http://www.aboutgerman.net/AGNforums/forum.php

I don't know if it has already been posted yet, sorry if it has. Thanks to all the Rosenrot members who have contributed to this thread, I've looked at some of the stuff posted already and I'm sure it will prove to be very helpful. :D

I've just added a link to the BBC German website. It has a list of German tv stations that broadcast programmes via their websites, as well as other resources.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/german/t ... rogs.shtml

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Last edited by EngelAnne on Mon Apr 02, 2012 8:35 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Online German Resources
PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2012 11:58 pm 
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^ Excellent! Thank you :)

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 Post subject: Re: Online German Resources
PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2012 12:01 pm 
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Well, I've been gone for a good long while (not intentional, I assure you), and have been spending much of that time studying German. Now I'm currently in Germany (Berlin, to be exact) for about 5 more months, doing nothing but studying the German language, history, and culture. Therefore, I thought that it would be appropriate to make my first post about more resources to help those learning German! :-)

First off is this website by the German Dept. of the University of Michigan:
http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/Gra ... index.html

Although the design/layout of the website could be made a little more easy to navigate, I highly recommend it for its resources, ranging from clear explanations of the German cases and adjective endings, to links to websites for German radio, German movies, and the vocabulary related to them. Due to the sheer volume of stuff here and the unclear navigation, make sure that you set aside at least an hour to browse through everything first.

Second is this wonderful blog geared specifically towards English-speakers learning German:
http://blogs.transparent.com/german/

As far as I can tell, all the contributors are native German-speakers, and all of the posts are highly informative about culture, vocabulary, and grammar, and are quite fun to read as well. Many posts are also little games or quizzes for you to test what you just learned; because this blog was created by a language-learning company (Transparent Language), some high-quality vocab videos are often made too (which you can find on Youtube--just search for "Transparent German"). Best of all, it's all free! Great for reading just a few minutes a day. :D

Third is this handy list of links from the Goethe-Institut:
http://www.goethe.de/lks/deindex.htm

Just click the flag at the top to change languages if you need it (although I recommend only doing that to learn what words mean, and to keep it in German most of the time if you're trying to learn so that you can test yourself to see how much you can tell from the context). They've got quite a few things listed for those interested in any of these categories and how they relate to German/Germany, but most people here should be interested in the Materialen für Deutschlerner. Click on any category and you'll be taken to yet more links that pertain to it. Some really quality stuff, here!

For those living in Germany, looking to live in Germany, or who are just plain curious, check out the following:
http://www.young-germany.de/
http://magazine-germany.com/en.html

Also check out the following news sites, as you can imitate what you hear on the streaming video, practice reading, and get caught up on the latest news at the same time!:
http://www.tagesschau.de/
http://www.tagesspiegel.de/
http://www.t-online.de/
http://www.spiegel.de/
http://www.kicker.de/

Hope that all this was useful. More to come soon! :D

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 Post subject: Re: Online German Resources
PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2012 11:34 pm 
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^ Many thanks! :)

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 Post subject: Re: Online German Resources
PostPosted: Tue Feb 25, 2014 1:26 am 
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If anyone is on Facebook, I find this link very useful https://www.facebook.com/dw.learngerman
They not only provide material in Grammar and Lexicon but also propose many exercices every day,
so that you can interact and practice. They also give the "loesung" and a brief explanation.
I see they also have other platforms for other languages but I don't know if they are so good.
They are the same as the Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten http://www.dw.de/deutsch-lernen/nachrichten/s-8030 :rrflag:

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 Post subject: Re: Online German Resources
PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 11:59 am 
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^ Thank you! :hug:

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 Post subject: Re: Online German Resources
PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 8:40 pm 
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^ You're welcome !!!

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